Speech Therapy for Adults

Adult presenter

One in seven Australians have some form of communication disability (Speech Pathology Australia 2001).  Whether we like it or not, our ability to develop and maintain relationships and succeed at work depend heavily on our communication skills.

While Eastside Speech specialises in children's therapy, we also see a large number of adults for assistance with:

  • Articulation problems - saying speech sounds correctly
  • Accent improvement
  • Speech and communication difficulties following oral cancer, a stroke, head injury or other neurological problems
  • Voice problems
  • Stuttering

We provide friendly and professional assessments and individualised therapy sessions to help you confidently achieve your full potential.

Articulation problems

Many people reach their 20's and 30's and decide it's time to "fix" that problem they have saying some speech sounds. They particularly want to fix their lisp or just speak more clearly and confidently.

Remember, it is never too late to do this and will make a great deal of difference to your speech clarity and self confidence.  Please contact us if you would like to talk to someone about your speech.

Using your voice safely

Having problems with your voice starts off being annoying.  However, if prolonged, it can become distressing and have a huge impact on your professional and social life.  Professional voice users are at the greatest risk of developing a voice disorder.

The staff at Eastside Speech are experienced in working with clients with voice disorders and understand the importance of:

  • Looking after your voice
  • Raising your voice safely

If you run a business where staff are constantly at risk of damaging their voices, we are able to provide group Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) sessions to help your staff look after their voices.

Please contact us if you would like to make an appointment to discuss your voice needs.

Adult lecturer

Frequently Asked Questions about Speech Therapy

Visit our FAQ section for more information about our services:

  • When should I consult a speech pathologist about my child?

    Answer

    In summary, call Eastside Speech Solutions and ask for your child to be
    assessed if:

    • You are worried about your child's language comprehension, expression and/or understanding
    • You think your child's understanding is different from other children
      of the same age (click here to read more about developmental milestones)
    • Your child stutters (no matter what their age)
    • Your child's voice sounds different from other children's e.g it sounds hoarse
    • Your child's teacher expresses concern.
  • What are the developmental milestones for a toddler?

    Answer

    By the age of one, your baby should be able to:

    • Say dad, mumma and a few other words
    • Try to make familiar sounds, such as car and animal noises
    • Respond to familiar sounds such as the telephone ringing, vacuum cleaner or a car in the driveway
    • Understand simple commands such as "no!"
    • Recognise their own name
    • Understand the names of familiar objects and people
    • Enjoy songs, music and books.

    By the age of two most children start to talk to themselves and you can seen their language and communication skills starting to develop:

    • Listen to stories and say the names of the pictures
    • Understand simple sentences, such as "where's your shoe?"
    • Say the names of simple body parts such as nose or tummy
    • Use more than 50 words such as "no", "gone", "mine" and "teddy"
    • Talk to themselves or their toys in play
    • Sing simple songs such as "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little star" or "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep"
    • Try simple sentences such as "Milk all gone"
    • Use some simple pronouns such as "he", "if"
    • Should be able to say m, n and h correctly.

    By the age of three, your child's communication should be understood by family, close friends and regular carers and they should be able to:

    • Understand how objects are used e.g. a crayon is something you draw with
    • Recognise their own needs such as hunger
    • Follow directions
    • Understand basic concepts (in/under, hot/cold)
    • Use 3-4 word sentences
    • Understand basic grammar
    • Enjoy telling stories and asking questions
    • Should be able to say p, b, m, n, ng, w, y, t, d, k, g and f

    By the age of four, your child should be able to be understood most of the time by most people.  If you find friends and acquaintances can not understand your child's express then perhaps a visit to a therapist may be warranted.  Your child should be able to:

    • Understand shape and colour names
    • Understand "wh" questions such as "where are they going?" or "why did he fall?"
    • Understand "time" words such as lunchtime, today, winter
    • Use lots of words (900+) and understand complex sentences
    • Use 4-5 word sentences
    • Use correct grammar most of the time
    • Use language when playing with other children
    • Should be able to say s, z, sh, ch and j

    This is by no means an exhaustive list.  If you are concerned about any aspect of your baby or toddler's speech or language please give us a call.

    Click here for milestones for school age children.

  • Is stuttering ever normal?

    Answer

    Stuttering is never a normal part of a child's (or adult's) speech and is not caused by anxiety, stress or poor parenting. Whilst many children do stop stuttering, about 20% continue to stutter into adulthood if left untreated. In general, if your child is 4 years old or if they have been stuttering for about 6 months, now is the time to seek help.

  • What is tongue thrust?

    Answer

    A tongue thrust is a condition where the tongue rests incorrectly (e.g. between the teeth) or moves forward during a swallow.  The result is that the tongue pushes against or protrudes between the upper and lower teeth.

    Some common indicators of a tongue thrust include:

    • an open bite
    • poor teeth alignment
    • poor muscle tone in the lips and cheeks
    • an open mouth resting posture during the day and/or at night
    • a tongue that you can see resting between the teet
    • difficulties saying "s, z, t or d" sounds
    • excessive lip licking or drooling
    • snoring.

     

  • What is PROMPT Therapy?

    Answer

    PROMPT is an acronym for Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets.  It is a therapy developed in the 1980's by Deborah Hayden, founder of the PROMPT® Institute.  It is a holistic approach that assesses not just a client's speech movement patterns but how their speech production interacts with their language and cognitive abilities as well as their social and emotional skills.  Therapy goals are set taking into account the whole person and their needs.

  • How can I learn more about how PROMPT can help my child?

    Answer

    The PROMPT institute has a very helpful website http://www.promptinstitute.com with information about PROMPT. At Eastside Speech we regularly run parent-training workshops for parents of children in our clinic. These workshops provide a comprehensive overview of the PROMPT apporach and help parents and caregivers to be involved in therapy planning and goal setting. They are generally run over 3 evenings.

Useful Speech and Communication Resources

Here are a list of sites and resources we have found useful for our patients: